Tag Archives: how to start a business

7-Lessons for Business Success

7-Lessons for Business Success

by Carrie Greene

I participated in a “painting party” with seventy business owners. Painting has never been my thing. I don’t see myself as artistic. And creating an image by drawing, painting, sketching or anything else like that makes me uncomfortable.

There were rows of tables and easels. Each seat had paint, brushes and an apron. There were three platforms, also with easels for the instructors and a bar.

I searched for an excuse. How could I possibly get out of this “party”? I did not think it was going to be fun; in fact, I was certain I was about to expose some serious shortcomings.

With no way to escape, I got myself a glass of wine, took a deep breath and picked a seat near one of the platforms (I wanted to be close to an instructor).

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 The instructors went step-by-step, telling us which colors and brushes to use, where to paint and how to mix the colors.

I listened, I watched, I followed the directions as best as I could and I painted (and drank a little wine).

After a few minutes the room filled with laughter. We were having fun.

It took about an hour to finish the paintings.

Afterwards, I wandered around and looked at the paintings. Every one was different and while they probably aren’t museum quality, they all came out really good.

As I checked out everyone’s work I realized that there were lessons to be learned from the experience that apply directly to your business.

Here’s what I noticed.

1. We were all given the same materials and directions and told how much paint to use. Yet the colors turned out all different. They were all nice but some used more pigment and the colors were bold and deep, some used less color. They were less intense and softer.

Lesson: How do you approach your business?

Do you just go for it, throw caution to the wind? Do you take it slowly and cautiously? Do you stop when it is good enough, like I did because I was afraid I’d mess it up if I touched it anymore?

2. The instructors talked about “working the colors,” adding more to increase the depth, the texture and the contrast in the painting. It was obvious looking at the paintings that some people did more of this than others.

Lesson: In your business do you just put something out there and walk away from it?

Do you tweak and refine it a little, so it’s good enough? Or do you keep working and working it and are never satisfied?

3. No two paintings were alike. Some of the difference can be attributed to skill with a paintbrush but it went further than that. The real differences were about following, or not following, the directions. We were supposed to paint a sunset scene, there were several paintings that had nothing to do with a sunset, the painter simply wanted to do something else.

Lesson: In your business when do you follow directions?

When do you do whatever you want to do? When there is an expert leading do you follow their advice or do you ignore it? Do you follow an assignment or do you set your own rules? There is certainly a time and a place for both, just make sure that you consciously decide which rules to follow and which to set aside. 4. At some point along the way, most of us fell behind or got lost in the directions. Everyone handled those moments of confusion differently. Some asked the instructor for help, others called to assistants who were walking around, some asked the person sitting next to them, others looked at the person next to them and guessed at the next step, some made it up and others gave up.

 7-Lessons For Business Success
7-Lessons For Business Success

Lesson: What do you do when you don’t know the next step to take? Do you get frustrated and stop? Do you ask for help? If you ask for help, who do you get to help you? 5. There were over a hundred people at the event; only seventy participated in the painting party.

Lesson: These people missed out on a really fun time. Do you engage even if you’re scared? Trying something new can be scary. Painting is WAY outside of my comfort zone. What do you automatically avoid in your business without really understanding what’s involved or even trying?

6. I already told you that I do not see myself as an artist. I don’t believe I can paint; yet when I came home I showed my painting to my son and he said “Wow, that’s really nice! And you say you can’t paint!”

Lesson: What assumptions do you make about your skills that stop you even before you start? Where are you shortchanging yourself? Where are you shortchanging your clients?

7. When we were done we checked out everyone else’s painting. A lot of them were really good but the “artist” would say that they didn’t like it. Thinking back to the evening, I said that I liked my grass but didn’t like the way the sun looked. The next morning I walked by the painting in my hotel room, it caught my eye and before I realized it was mine, I thought, that’s a nice painting.

Lesson: Do you see yourself and your work fairly? Do you pre-judge yourself? Are you open to seeing and acknowledging what you are doing well? I mean, be honest with yourself for a moment, if you weren’t talking about yourself what would you think of your accomplishments? Would you look for the flaws or the good?

Have you ever done something out of your comfort zone and found yourself surprised by the outcome? Do you pre-judge yourself? Do you risk embarrassment?

More Information:

Carrie Greene is a speaker, author and business coach. She is a business strategist who helps entrepreneurs get clear on what they want and create simple and straight-forward plans to get there. She is the author of “Chaos to Cash: An Entrepreneur’s Guide to Eliminating Chaos, Overwhelm and Procrastination So You Can Create Ultimate Profit!” Free resources at http://carriegreenecoaching.com/

Source: http://www.PopularArticles.com/article467177.html

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The Home Office – Focus on Business

The Home Office – Focus on Business
by Daniel D Lotts

While it’s so much more relaxed and casual to work from your home office, you still need to keep in mind that it is for the purpose of business that you are there. As part of focusing your mind on the work you need to do to develop and maintain a business, what you see in front of you is directly related.

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Why add continually navigating chaos to your work-related tasks every time you do something? It wastes time and energy, not to mention causes you to lose focus on what you need to be doing. Make staying organized part of your work day and put things away! Get folders for things and even if all you have is a box or plastic crate, put your folders or important papers in there. ‘Out of sight out of mind’ has special relevance here. If your workspace is organized you will think and see things more clearly. Remove anything that is not related to business out of your office space entirely if you can.

There is more than one reason for creating a focused environment in your home office. For tax purposes, particularly if it is the case that you only make part of your income from home, when you are claiming home business deductions (which you should) then you have to have a clear delineation to separate ‘home’ from ‘business.’ In fact, an actual door on your office is required. (For those lucky enough to earn their entire income from home, you don’t need the door but you still need to have an area dedicated only to business.

In any case you can figure the square feet in your living space and determine how much is used exclusively for business. Then you can deduct expenses based on that percentage for rent, utilities, insurance, etc., in addition to directly related business expenses such as office supplies, equipment, etc.

Business
Business

Just be sure you have receipts for every penny you claim. Another element to organize and to keep a folder marked ‘Taxes’ where you put receipts and invoices all year long, so you are not scrambling at the last minute, and maybe even missing something that would have been a deduction to your self-employment income taxes.

Be sure that part of your organization and focus involves committing your time (scheduling) – where you will sit and work and do nothing else. Turn on your voice mail and be sure that your family and friends know and respect your hours of business just as they would have to if you were going off to a job. If you have little kids then obviously this time allocated to your business should be when they are at school or sleeping if possible.

You really won’t get as much done, or retain as much information if you are constantly being interrupted by the doorbell, phone, kids, dog, etc. Of course the kids (and dogs) are some of the main good reasons you have for starting a home business; and of course you can’t always have 100% control over them, but with a little planning and mutual respect you can have more time for them and still have a successful business.

Oh – and don’t forget to rest – when you shut down (and put everything away) at the end of your work time, shut the door – even if the door is only in your mind. You have to have a time where you are OFF work – to relax and enjoy the other facets of your life. Resist the temptation to log back on your computer every time you get a bright idea. Just write it down and take care of it next time you go back to work.

More Information:

Daniel Lotts is the owner of www.dreamaffiliate.com and is dedicated to helping you succeed when starting a home based business. 100% Proven Online Profits! Visit today for more info or check out the site’s #1 home business at: http://www.PlugInProfitSite.com/main-18923

Source: http://www.PopularArticles.com/article464310.html

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